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♫ His Music Will Live ForEver ♫

“Over the years we became a family,all of us.You are my family…My children are your children and all the children of the world are our children and our responsibility.

It was you,who put your heart on the line.It was you,who stepped forward to defend someone you love.It was you,on a worldwide basis who supported me as my army,my soldiers of love.

You were always there.You are always loyal and I love you forever.” Michael Jackson
Apr 23 '14

Michael’s Image In Toast

Gabriel Aguilar, a big Michael Jackson fan from Mexico, has decided to re-create Michael’s image in an unusual, but tasty way.

After recently reporting on the fan who created Michael’s image by painting it in Nutella, Aguilar has re-created a picture of Michael from 1992 out of toast! The way it’s done is by toasting/burning sections of bread, but covering certain areas in aluminum foil and toasting piece by piece. Every slice of bread needs to be toasted twice in a small oven and the whole process takes three days in total.

Apr 23 '14
myinspirationmj:

"I know a tree feels it when the wind blows through it. It probably goes, ‘Chhhhhh, this is wonderful.’ And that’s how I feel when I’m singing some songs. It’s wonderful.”   Michael Jackson

myinspirationmj:

"I know a tree feels it when the wind blows through it. It probably goes, ‘Chhhhhh, this is wonderful.’ And that’s how I feel when I’m singing some songs. It’s wonderful.”   Michael Jackson

Apr 23 '14
badtourgirl:

XSCAPE - Review from USA TodayIt’s easy, and probably healthy, to approach any new release of Michael Jackson music with some skepticism. Nearly five years after his death, the King of Pop remains both an indelible influence on contemporary artists and a source of the kind of prurient and morose fascination that is always as marketable, if not as memorable, as a great tune.Luckily, the posthumous Xscape, out May 13, offers some reminders of why Jackson entered our collective consciousness to begin with. The eight tracks here showcase songs, culled from the late superstar’s vault, originally recorded between 1983 and 1999, after Jackson’s early creative peak as a recording artist (with his 1979 solo breakthrough Off the Wall and 1982’s Thriller).Still, executive producer L.A Reid and lead producer Timbaland — with support at the boards from other noted hitmakers such as Stargate, J-Roc and Rodney Jerkins — ensure that Jackson’s enduring strengths as a singer are represented, layering in modern electronic textures without overwhelming the distinctly slinky, shivery vocals or overall structure of the tunes.Love Never Felt So Good — written and initially produced by Jackson and Paul Anka, and co-produced here by John McClain, a co-executor of Jackson’s estate, and Giorgio Tuinfort — has an old-school snap and tingle, with warm, leaping strings that recall the melodic and rhythmic punch of Jackson’s work with Quincy Jones.Loving You, crafted by Jackson during sessions for 1987’s Bad and revisited here by Timbaland, is similarly blithe and nostalgic, with tinkling piano chords and tickling percussion set against the latter artist’s trademark syncopation.Other tracks are edgier and more aggressive, sonically and in their lyrics. For Jackson, love and anxiety were often inextricably entwined; Do You Know Where Your Children Are (also from the Bad era) documents a parent’s nightmare with a thumping groove, while the chilly, Cory Rooney-penned Chicago finds its narrator vexed by a duplicitous woman.On Slave to the Rhythm, an intriguing 1989 Reid/Babyface creation brought back by Timbaland and Jerome Harmon, it’s the girl who suffers, as Jackson croons over a frantically chugging, swirling arrangement about a woman who tries to break the chains that bind her at home and work.Slave is playful at first, opening with Jackson’s trademark yelps and hiccups, but there is clear empathy in his portrait of a trapped person desperate to find “a beat of her own.” It seems especially poignant here that for this star, escape, like Xscape, only came posthumously.source:http://www.usatoday.com/story/life/music/2014/04/21/first-listen-michael-jackson-posthumous-xscape/7553229/

badtourgirl:

XSCAPE - Review from USA Today

It’s easy, and probably healthy, to approach any new release of Michael Jackson music with some skepticism. Nearly five years after his death, the King of Pop remains both an indelible influence on contemporary artists and a source of the kind of prurient and morose fascination that is always as marketable, if not as memorable, as a great tune.

Luckily, the posthumous Xscape, out May 13, offers some reminders of why Jackson entered our collective consciousness to begin with. The eight tracks here showcase songs, culled from the late superstar’s vault, originally recorded between 1983 and 1999, after Jackson’s early creative peak as a recording artist (with his 1979 solo breakthrough Off the Wall and 1982’s Thriller).

Still, executive producer L.A Reid and lead producer Timbaland — with support at the boards from other noted hitmakers such as Stargate, J-Roc and Rodney Jerkins — ensure that Jackson’s enduring strengths as a singer are represented, layering in modern electronic textures without overwhelming the distinctly slinky, shivery vocals or overall structure of the tunes.

Love Never Felt So Good — written and initially produced by Jackson and Paul Anka, and co-produced here by John McClain, a co-executor of Jackson’s estate, and Giorgio Tuinfort — has an old-school snap and tingle, with warm, leaping strings that recall the melodic and rhythmic punch of Jackson’s work with Quincy Jones.

Loving You, crafted by Jackson during sessions for 1987’s Bad and revisited here by Timbaland, is similarly blithe and nostalgic, with tinkling piano chords and tickling percussion set against the latter artist’s trademark syncopation.

Other tracks are edgier and more aggressive, sonically and in their lyrics. For Jackson, love and anxiety were often inextricably entwined; Do You Know Where Your Children Are (also from the Bad era) documents a parent’s nightmare with a thumping groove, while the chilly, Cory Rooney-penned Chicago finds its narrator vexed by a duplicitous woman.

On Slave to the Rhythm, an intriguing 1989 Reid/Babyface creation brought back by Timbaland and Jerome Harmon, it’s the girl who suffers, as Jackson croons over a frantically chugging, swirling arrangement about a woman who tries to break the chains that bind her at home and work.

Slave is playful at first, opening with Jackson’s trademark yelps and hiccups, but there is clear empathy in his portrait of a trapped person desperate to find “a beat of her own.” It seems especially poignant here that for this star, escape, like Xscape, only came posthumously.

source:http://www.usatoday.com/story/life/music/2014/04/21/first-listen-michael-jackson-posthumous-xscape/7553229/

Apr 23 '14

(Source: mj-king)

Apr 23 '14
Apr 22 '14
"Michael Jackson was destroyed. Like no other person in our times. You have to remember that Michael Jackson was innocent. He was proved innocent in our courts. If you read the transcripts of the trial it is insanity, it should never have gone to court. We spent tens of millions of dollars to prosecute him when we don’t have money for schools in California."
David LaChapelle: American Jesus - NOWNESS (via expressionsofpassion)

(Source: fragileicicle)

Apr 22 '14

(Source: bluemoonwalker)

Apr 22 '14
Apr 22 '14
"When some fans who attended Michael’s Madison Square Garden concerts on September 7 and 10, 2001, were stranded in New York when air traffic halted after 9/11, Michael assigned a bodyguard, paid for several of them to stay in the Helmsley Palace Hotel, chartered a bus to take them shopping, and covered all their expenses until they could return home. “The Spanish Embassy said they couldn’t help me,” Dulce remembered, “but Michael did."
Michael Gross, “Starstruck”, on how Michael Jackson took care of fans stranded in New York after 9/11 (via lacienegasmiled)
Apr 22 '14
Apr 22 '14
Apr 22 '14

tally777:

Lovely pics of Michael and Dominic Cascio in Brunei in 1996.

(Source: facebook.com)

Apr 22 '14
Apr 22 '14
".. from a water balloon fighter to a pop music star to a caring, attentive father” ~ At night, when all the visitors had left, Michael would take his kids on twilight walks around Neverland. It was touching to see Prince and Paris walking on either side of him, their little hands in his. Michael would point out a bird or a duck while Prince occasionally scrambled ahead like a puppy and Paris stayed next to her dad, a demure little lady. Michael seized any opportunity that arose to teach the children life lessons. If they saw a deer, or another animal, he would tell them about its life and its habits while they stood watching it. The sky, the grass, a tree:
Michael saw the value of every detail of his surroundings and introduced each to his children. He wanted them to love what was around them and not take the wonders of creation for granted. It never ceased to amaze me how easily he could change from a water balloon fighter to a pop music star to a caring, attentive father. It was a transition that, even now, I find hard to explain, but it was one that he did every day with ease."
Frank Cascio - from the book, My Friend Michael (via myinspirationmj)
Apr 22 '14

tally777:

 In her autobiography A Memoir, Cyndi Lauper says Michael borrowed the bassline for the title track of Bad from the ending of her hit ‘She Bop’.

"Right before he went in to record Bad he sat behind me on an airplane with Emmanuel Lewis and he was listening to ‘She Bop," Lauper says. "I don’t think it wasn’t a surprise, he was always listening to She Bop. But it was great, I mean, that’s Michael Jackson." 

Photos credit MJ Sabe